At C-Suite Assistants, we specialize in the placement of executive assistants and administrative professionals nationwide. 

During this process, clients and candidates regularly ask for our guidance; one of the topics discussed is administrative compensation.

For this reason, we developed a short, but comprehensive, C-Suite Administrative Professionals Compensation Survey.  In this first survey, we have collected and analyzed 2013 compensation information of administrative professionals based on a number of variables in order to accurately assess the administrative market.  We will publish the results of our survey biannually for your review.

If you are an administrative professional and would like to contribute your compensation information to our findings, click here.  Your answers are completely anonymous.

If you are an HR professional, hiring authority, or administrative professional interested in receiving the detailed analysis of this survey's results, or results from future compensation surveys, click here.

What is base salary?  Base salary is the amount of money paid out to an employee in exchange for work performed.  Base salaries do not include benefits, bonuses, overtime pay (whenever applicable) or any other potential compensation from an employer, and is usually paid out bi-weekly.  Base salary is determined by the market rate or industry standard for individuals performing in similar roles.

What is base salary?  Base salary is the amount of money paid out to an employee in exchange for work performed.  Base salaries do not include benefits, bonuses, overtime pay (whenever applicable) or any other potential compensation from an employer, and is usually paid out bi-weekly.  Base salary is determined by the market rate or industry standard for individuals performing in similar roles.

What is a bonus? A bonus is an amount of money paid to employees in addition to their base salary as an added benefit.  Bonuses are used to reward employees for their work for the year in order to further help them feel recognized and valued.  Giving an employee a bonus is not required and should not typically be expected.

What is a bonus? A bonus is an amount of money paid to employees in addition to their base salary as an added benefit.  Bonuses are used to reward employees for their work for the year in order to further help them feel recognized and valued.  Giving an employee a bonus is not required and should not typically be expected.

What is overtime?  According to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), non-exempt employees covered by the Act must receive overtime pay for hours worked over 40 in a workweek.[1]  A workweek is defined as a consecutive 7-day or 168-hour period of time.  (To learn more about who is covered by the FLSA, visit dol.gov). [1] U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division. (2008). Fact Sheet #23 Overtime Pay Requirements of the FLSA. Retrieved from http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/whdfs23.pdf

What is overtime?  According to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), non-exempt employees covered by the Act must receive overtime pay for hours worked over 40 in a workweek.[1]  A workweek is defined as a consecutive 7-day or 168-hour period of time.  (To learn more about who is covered by the FLSA, visit dol.gov).

[1] U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division. (2008). Fact Sheet #23 Overtime Pay Requirements of the FLSA. Retrieved from http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/whdfs23.pdf

What is all-in compensation?  All-in compensation is defined as the total compensation for 2013 for administrative professionals including base salary, bonus, and overtime pay.

What is all-in compensation?  All-in compensation is defined as the total compensation for 2013 for administrative professionals including base salary, bonus, and overtime pay.